• Creosote bush could treat Giardia and `brain-eating' amoeba infections

    Used in Native American healing, some compounds in pungent plant stronger than pharmaceutical

    Compounds produced by the creosote bush, a desert shrub common to American Southwest, exhibit potent anti-parasitic properties against two deadly parasites responsible for Giardia infections (Giardia lamblia) and the amoeba that causes an often-lethal form of encephalitis (Naegleria fowleri), according to researchers at the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at CU Anschutz and UC San Diego.… Full Story

    August 16, 2017
    David Kelly
    Compounds from the creosote bush may fight two deadly parasitic infections.
  • Major communication gaps between doctors and home health care nurses

    CU Anschutz researchers say this may contribute to errors and hospital readmission

    Researchers at the University of  Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found serious gaps in communication between physicians and home health care agencies (HHC) responsible for caring for often elderly patients discharged from hospitals.… Full Story

    July 19, 2017
    David Kelly
  • Immune system may keep body from neutralizing HIV-1 virus

    Findings could help develop a vaccine for the virus that causes AIDS

    Researchers at the University of  Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have discovered that a process protecting the body from autoimmune disease appears to prevent it from creating antibodies that can neutralize the HIV-1 virus, a finding that could possibly help lead to a vaccine that stimulates production of these antibodies.… Full Story

    July 12, 2017
    David Kelly
  • Researchers to study neurological effects of Zika virus in children

    CU Anschutz, Baylor and Guatemalan researchers receive NIH funding for study

    Researchers at the University of  Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and the Baylor College of Medicine will join with Guatemalan investigators in a major study examining the clinical outcomes of children infected with the Zika virus after being born, focusing on long-term brain development.… Full Story

    June 19, 2017
    David Kelly
  • Interventions like telephone calls can reduce suicide attempts

    Phone calls following ED discharge significantly cut risks

    In perhaps the largest national suicide intervention trial ever conducted, researchers at the University of  Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Brown University found that phone calls to suicidal patients following discharge from Emergency Departments led to a 30 percent reduction in future suicide attempts.… Full Story

    May 1, 2017
    David Kelly
  • Scientists use high tech microscope to find clues into rare disease

    CU Anschutz researchers able to see disease process unfold

    Using a unique microscope capable of illuminating living cell structures in great detail, researchers at the University of  Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found clues into how a destructive autoimmune disease works, setting the stage for more discoveries in the future.… Full Story

    April 26, 2017
    David Kelly
  • Cannabinoids may soothe certain skin diseases

    Anti-inflammatory properties may be the key

    Cannabinoids contain anti-inflammatory properties that could make them useful in the treatment of a wide-range of skin diseases, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.… Full Story

    April 18, 2017
    David Kelly
  • States can reduce measles outbreaks by toughening exemption policies

    Strengthening exemptions could boost vaccination coverage, reduce costs

    States with weaker non-medical exemption policies for vaccinations can reduce the likelihood of a measles outbreak 140 to 190 percent by strengthening them, a new study from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus shows.… Full Story

    March 21, 2017
    David Kelly
  • Even after treatment, brains of anorexia nervosa patients altered

    CU Anschutz researchers find brains need time to normalize

    Even after weeks of treatment and considerable weight gain, the brains of adolescent patients with anorexia nervosa remain altered, putting them at risk for possible relapse, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.… Full Story

    March 1, 2017
    David Kelly
    Brain scan image