Colorado Rapids Youth Soccer training facility.

The Colorado Rapids Youth Soccer Club (CRYSC) is partnering with leading sports medicine specialists at the University of Colorado Department of Orthopedics at the CU School of Medicine and UCHealth to ensure its athletes receive unsurpassed care as well as education about injury prevention.

Acting as liaison between CU, CRYSC and UCHealth is Head Athletic Trainer Julie Graves, MA, ATC, who became the full-time athletic trainer for the Colorado Storm soccer club two years ago. Her role has expanded as the Storm recently merged with CRYSC, creating a super-club of over 10,000 players ages 3 to 18. CU Orthopedics’ title sponsorship is similar to the arrangement with Storm, but “it’s just at a bigger volume,” Graves said. “We’ve had two years of providing top-tier care and it’s going extremely well.”

Responsive treatment

Julie Graves
Julie Graves, MA, ATC, is the head athletic trainer for the Colorado Rapids Youth Soccer Club.

Teaming with CRYSC and its five regions along the Front Range comes at an ideal time as the Department of Orthopedics is experiencing a high rate of growth. “Adding this to our portfolio positions the department for a high level of exposure across Colorado, and we look forward to strategically growing this relationship with the Colorado Rapids Youth Soccer Club over the next several years,” said David Kaplan, Orthopedics Department finance administrator.

Graves works with three medical directors who volunteer their time to provide care for club members. “We try to get our kids directly into one of those three first and foremost, but if they’re overbooked we find another CU sports medicine specialist to provide care,” Graves said. “This really gets them right where they need to go in an expedited manner.”

Graves has treated a variety of injuries on the field including dislocated kneecaps, labral hip tears and sprained ankles. However, treatment doesn’t stop on the field. Graves further develops the at-home rehab program, recommending exercises and stretches, and follows up on the player’s progress. Graves has also established an athletic training evaluation space inside the CRYSC Central Region headquarters where the members come to have their appointments. Having a dedicated space gives her the ability to see injuries within 24 to 48 hours, as well as provide treatment or taping before practice.

Positioned for injury prevention

The partnership between CRYSC and CU Orthopedics is a special one. Kaplan notes, “Becoming a sponsor uniquely positions us to focus on injury prevention with these young athletes and ultimately care for them at the appropriate location when an injury does occur. The Sports Medicine team across the School of Medicine has the expertise and experience to take care of the Colorado Rapids Youth Soccer Club athletes similar to the way we cover University of Denver athletics, University of Colorado athletics, Denver Nuggets, Colorado Avalanche, Mammoth, Rockies and Denver Broncos.”

For athletes, the presence of an athletic trainer takes away the worry of when an injury occurs and next steps. In the event of a more serious injury, Graves close working relationship with CU Sports Medicine specialists has afforded her the ability to refer athletes and their parents to the most appropriate specialist depending on location, severity, or type of injury. This is the same approach CU Sports Medicine takes with collegiate level teams and the professional teams they support.

Graves frequently hears from grateful parents. “I’ve gotten absolutely wonderful feedback from the athletes and parents,” she said. “They’re so grateful that the club has an athletic trainer and a huge orthopedic partnership that provides quick, effective and professional treatment for their kids.”