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MEdia Clips

CU Anschutz In The News


ABC News

Some Hospitals are Ditching Lead Aprons During X-Rays

ABC News
Publish DateJanuary 16, 2020

New thinking among radiologists and medical physicists is upending the decades-old practice of shielding patients from radiation.“There’s this big psychological component, not only with patients but with staff,” said Rebecca Marsh, a medical physicist at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, Colorado, who spoke about shielding at a December forum here at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. “How do you approach something that is so deeply ingrained in the minds of the health care community and the minds of patients?”

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CPR

Most Health Care Workers In Colorado Are Required To Get Flu Shots, But Are They?

CPR
Publish DateJanuary 16, 2020

Colorado became one of the early states to begin pushing for rules requiring health care workers get flu vaccines. And in general, the rules have been a success, according to Dr. Matt Wynia, the Director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus and an early supporter of the state regulations. “They found it to be extremely successful when you just tell people, 'Look you gotta do this,' then people do it,” Wynia said.

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WebMD

Opioid Use By Teens a Red Flag for Other Dangers

WebMD
Publish DateJanuary 10, 2020

Teenagers who've experimented with opioid painkillers are likely to be taking other health risks, a new study finds. It's important for doctors and parents to know these behaviors commonly go hand-in-hand, said lead researcher Dr. Devika Bhatia at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. So when teenage patients display other serious risk-taking, doctors might ask them whether they've ever abused opioids, according to Bhatia.

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Science News

Healthy Babies Exposed to Zika in the Womb May Suffer Developmental Delays

Science News
Publish DateJanuary 10, 2020

Babies from Colombia who were born healthy after being exposed to the Zika virus in the womb showed signs of neurodevelopmental delays by 18 months of age, a small study finds. Because there was variability between individuals, “looking at a population enables one to see overall trends,” says neurologist Ken Tyler of the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, who was not involved in the research. 

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USA Today

Trump's 'Remain in Mexico' policy is traumatizing kids. Bring asylum-seekers here to heal

USA Today
Publish DateJanuary 10, 2020

Opinion column by Steven Berkowitz, professor of psychiatry and the director of the Stress, Trauma, Adversity Research and Treatment Center at the CU School of Medicine, and co-author: “As these children and parents arrive at our doorstep seeking asylum, as is their legal right, it is wrong for this administration to knowingly place them in dangerous environments when safe alternatives exist and their presence in the United States has no negative impact on our society. It is our duty to protect them.”

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Health Day

Pot Use Appears to Change Structure of Your Heart: Study

Health Day
Publish DateJanuary 03, 2020

It could be the smoke that’s being inhaled that places strain on the heart, or it could be THC, the chemical in pot that gets you high, said Larry Allen, a professor of cardiology at the CU School of Medicine. THC has been shown to increase heart rate and blood pressure, cause blood to clot more easily, and affect the inner lining of blood vessels, he said. “We have some basic laboratory data that suggests there may be adverse health effects of THC,” Allen said.

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CPR

Congress Is About To Give $25 Million To Research Gun Violence. Not Everyone Is Happy About It

CPR
Publish DateJanuary 03, 2020

Dr. Emmy Betz is a professor at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus. She recently worked with gun shop owners, firearms trainers and public health researchers to create a resource for safe gun storage. She said the new money is significant because it’s the first time in a long time funds have been dedicated to this kind of research. “People are dying and people are being hurt and we need science to figure out how to stop it,” Betz said. “And that's not about gun control. That's about saving people's lives.”

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News Week

Ancient Egypt's Mythical Female Doctor Merit Ptah Helped 'Open Medicine and Stem to Women'

News Week
Publish DateDecember 18, 2019

Jakub Kwiecinski, a medical historian at the University of Colorado, turned a detective eye on Merit Ptah to trace her backstory and find out where the myth came from. Writing in the Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, Kwiecinski concludes Merit Ptah is a case of mistaken identity but while she might not be real in the historic sense, the myth helped "open medicine and STEM to women."

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