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Patient Care

Love dogs? Train a service canine for a good cause

Warrior Canine Connection seeks volunteers to help raise, train special pups

Author Staff | Publish Date February 14, 2019

Do you love dogs? The Warrior Canine Connection (WCC), a partner of the Marcus Institute for Brain Health, is looking for volunteers interested in puppy parenting and puppy sitting for its service dogs in training.

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Each service dog helps more than 60 recovering warriors as the canine is raised, trained and then paired with a veteran.

The WCC uses a mission-based trauma recovery model to help military service members recovering from the stress of combat, as well as reconnect with their families and communities and enhance their quality of life.

By interacting with the dogs as the canines move from puppy-hood to training to adult service dogs, warrior/veteran trainers benefit from a physiological and psychological animal-human connection. As a result of their efforts, veterans with disabilities receive the finest in trained service dogs.

This is an opportunity to give back to those who have served our nation. One service dog helps more than 60 recovering warriors as the canine is raised, trained and then paired with a veteran.

Service dog at CU Anschutz

A service dog poses outside the Marcus Institute for Brain Health at CU Anschutz.

If you are interested in being a part of raising and training these special dogs, or if you have any questions, please contact Ann Spader at aspader@warriorcanineconnection.org or 240-495-3008.

The Marcus Institute for Brain Health, located at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus, provides specialty care for military veterans and retired athletes struggling with mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries and changes in psychological health.