<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=799546403794687&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">

Story of the Week

Research    Patient Care    Press Releases

Lactate May Prompt Cancer Formation, CU Anschutz Study Shows

Author David Kelly | Publish Date January 15, 2020

A byproduct of glucose called lactate, used by every cell in the body, may also prompt a mutated cell to become cancerous, according to new research from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

Full Story

Latest Stories

Research    Patient Care    Press Releases

Grant To Help CU Anschutz Researcher Learn Why Therapeutic Horseback Riding Benefits Autistic Children

After showing that a 10-week therapeutic horseback riding intervention reduced irritability and hyperactivity while improving the social communication skills of youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD),  University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus researcher and Children’s Hospital Colorado psychologist, Dr. Robin Gabriels, has received a $2.5 million grant to investigate why the therapy works. 


Author David Kelly | Publish DateJanuary 21, 2020
Full Story

Patient Care

Veteran’s Pancreatic Cancer Caught ‘At Just the Right Time’

Steve Becker always looks forward to Veteran’s Day. He and his father, Don, did hitches in the Navy, so it’s a special day they set aside to hang out and reflect on their service to the nation.


Author Chris Casey | Publish DateJanuary 16, 2020
Full Story

Research    Patient Care    Press Releases

Lactate May Prompt Cancer Formation, CU Anschutz Study Shows

A byproduct of glucose called lactate, used by every cell in the body, may also prompt a mutated cell to become cancerous, according to new research from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.


Author David Kelly | Publish DateJanuary 15, 2020
Full Story

Research    Patient Care    Press Releases

Involving Family in Care for Bipolar Disorder Helps Children and Teens Stay Healthier

Children and adolescents with a high risk for developing bipolar disorder stayed healthier for longer periods when their family members participated in their psychotherapy sessions.


Author Guest Contributor | Publish DateJanuary 15, 2020
Full Story

CU Anschutz In the News

ABC News

Some Hospitals are Ditching Lead Aprons During X-Rays

ABC News
Publish DateJanuary 16, 2020

New thinking among radiologists and medical physicists is upending the decades-old practice of shielding patients from radiation.“There’s this big psychological component, not only with patients but with staff,” said Rebecca Marsh, a medical physicist at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, Colorado, who spoke about shielding at a December forum here at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. “How do you approach something that is so deeply ingrained in the minds of the health care community and the minds of patients?”

Full Story
CPR

Most Health Care Workers In Colorado Are Required To Get Flu Shots, But Are They?

CPR
Publish DateJanuary 16, 2020

Colorado became one of the early states to begin pushing for rules requiring health care workers get flu vaccines. And in general, the rules have been a success, according to Dr. Matt Wynia, the Director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus and an early supporter of the state regulations. “They found it to be extremely successful when you just tell people, 'Look you gotta do this,' then people do it,” Wynia said.

Full Story
WebMD

Opioid Use By Teens a Red Flag for Other Dangers

WebMD
Publish DateJanuary 10, 2020

Teenagers who've experimented with opioid painkillers are likely to be taking other health risks, a new study finds. It's important for doctors and parents to know these behaviors commonly go hand-in-hand, said lead researcher Dr. Devika Bhatia at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. So when teenage patients display other serious risk-taking, doctors might ask them whether they've ever abused opioids, according to Bhatia.

Full Story
Science News

Healthy Babies Exposed to Zika in the Womb May Suffer Developmental Delays

Science News
Publish DateJanuary 10, 2020

Babies from Colombia who were born healthy after being exposed to the Zika virus in the womb showed signs of neurodevelopmental delays by 18 months of age, a small study finds. Because there was variability between individuals, “looking at a population enables one to see overall trends,” says neurologist Ken Tyler of the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, who was not involved in the research. 

Full Story